Teaching Awards

◦ 2018-2019 University Outstanding Graduate Teaching Award from the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning, University of Connecticut

◦ Recognition for Teaching Excellence, Office of the Provost (2015, 2016)

Instructor of Record
(Fall 2014-Summer 2017)


Courses Taught:

PHIL 1104: Philosophy and Social Ethics

◦ Four classes of 30 students each

◦ This class is an introduction to major ethical theories, including virtue ethics, utilitarianism, deontology, and care ethics, and explores questions such as: do we have to be ethical to live a happy life? Is morality always other-directed, or can one have self-regarding moral duties? Can ethical inquiry help us find meaning in our lives?

◦ Average median rating of teaching by students: 4.5/5.0

◦ Sample student comment: “When she started teaching the material, she made it natural for students to give their opinion, and she never made anyone feel like what they said didn't matter. People seemed eager to contribute to class and her humor is casual, which makes people comfortable in class.”

PHIL 1107: Philosophy and Gender

◦ Three classes of 30 students each

◦ This course is an introduction to some of the major questions surrounding gender from the standpoint of social ethics. Topics include: gender essentialism and gender constructivism, transgender and intersex identities, intersectionality, masculinity, gender oppression and the obligation to resist.

◦ Average median rating of teaching by students: 4.6/5.0

◦ Sample student comment: “She allowed the students to have some jurisdiction over what we discussed and how long we spent on one topic. This flexibility was really nice because we were able to fully understand things that we might not have if we had rushed over them.”

PHIL 1106: Non-Western and Comparative Philosophy

◦ Two classes of 30 students each

◦ This course is in introduction to some of the major philosophical and religious views that grapple with questions of death, ethics, and reality. Texts representing Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism, Islam, and Akan philosophies are analyzed and compared to Western philosophers like Hume, Kant, Nietzsche, Sartre, and Beauvoir.

◦ Average median rating of teaching by students: 4.5/5.0

◦ Sample student comment: “She was very enthusiastic about the topic which made learning more interesting. She also related philosophical content to modern day life which made it easier to understand the subject.”

PHIL 1101: Problems in Philosophy

◦ One class of 40 students, co-taught

◦ This course serves as an introduction to some of the major questions in philosophical discourse, including: does God exist, and if so, how can God let suffering occur? How do we know what we know? What does it mean to do the right thing? Are we free?

Teaching Assistant (Fall 2012-Spring 2014)

◦ PHIL 1101 Problems of Philosophy (four classes of 20 students each)

◦ PHIL 1102 Philosophy and Logic (four classes of 20 students each)

◦ PHIL 1104 Philosophy and Social Ethics (four classes of 20 students each)

◦ PHIL 1107 Philosophy and Gender (four classes of 20 students each)